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PARSHAT KEDOSHIM 5784 – BETWEEN MAN AND MAN

בס”ד

Parshat Kedoshim

Integrating Torah into one’s life through reflection and conversation can be an incredibly fun and engaging experience. It’s a journey of discovery, where ancient wisdom and timeless teachings come to life in our daily experiences. Through reflection, we have the opportunity to dive deep into the rich tapestry of Torah, extracting profound insights and lessons that resonate with our modern lives. The joy lies in the ‘aha’ moments, those instances when a Torah verse or story suddenly connects with our personal challenges, aspirations, and values. And when we engage in conversations about Torah with others, it becomes an interactive exploration, where diverse perspectives and interpretations enhance our understanding. These dialogues often spark excitement and intellectual curiosity, making the learning process both enjoyable and fulfilling. Torah becomes a vibrant and dynamic part of our lives, offering not just guidance but also a source of endless fascination, connection, and growth.

NOTE: Don’t feel obligated to go through every source or answer all the questions—unless you want to. Even one source, or one question will give you plenty of material for discussion and meditation. Enjoy this!

Some thoughts from the parsha

Parshat Kedoshim presents fifty-one mitzvot, many emphasizing the pursuit of holiness. While many of these commandments relate to the relationship between individuals and G-d, a significant portion pertains to interpersonal relations. The name of the parsha, “kedoshim,” derived from the verse “You shall be holy; for I the L-rd your G-d am holy” (Leviticus 19:2), underscores the importance of striving for holiness in all aspects of life. Holiness is not limited to specific places or circumstances but permeates everywhere..

Interpersonal mitzvot, such as giving to the poor, play a crucial role in enhancing spirituality by fostering generosity and compassion. The Torah mandates leaving a portion of one’s yield for the poor, which, beyond the technicalities of this portion, i.e., the actual measurement, reveals the value of generosity of spirit.

Additionally, the Mishna encourages openness and generosity, echoing the practice of Avraham Avinu, whose tent was open from all sides to welcome guests.

The phrase “let your house be open to relief” suggests creating an environment of generosity and growth, where individuals can find solace, support, and guidance. By cultivating such a culture of generosity, one not only enriches the lives of others but also attracts divine abundance and blessings.

Now, consider these questions for deep personal reflection and discussion:

  1. How does the concept of holiness being achievable in all aspects of life challenge traditional perceptions of spirituality?
  2. Reflecting on moments when you’ve experienced spirituality in unexpected circumstances, what insights did those experiences offer about the nature of holiness?
  3. In what ways do acts of kindness and generosity towards others contribute to our own sense of fulfillment and spiritual well-being?
  4. How can the practice of “letting your house be open to relief” influence our understanding of hospitality and generosity in today’s society?
  5. Considering the idea that a culture of generosity attracts divine abundance, what steps can we take to foster such a culture in our own lives and communities?

Shabbat Shalom!

By Rabbi Tani Burton

If you want more questions for contemplation, SEE THE OTHER BLOGS FROM RABBI TANI BURTON ABOUT DE PARSHAT QUESTIONS

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